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Newsletter June 2020

Self-employed grants claim process now open

Since 13 May 2020, it has been possible to use online processes, accessed via the gov.uk website, to:

  • Clarify if you are eligible to apply for the Self-Employed Income Support Scheme, and
  • Lodge your claim. Payment should usually be in your bank account within 6 days.

Are you eligible?

By entering your unique tax reference number and National Insurance number you will be advised if you are eligible to make a claim and when you should do this. The link to this facility is on page https://www.tax.service.gov.uk/self-employment-support/enter-unique-taxpayer-reference

However, there have been comments in the press that HMRC has had problems with the complex calculations involved in making this decision. If you were expecting to receive a payment under this scheme and are advised that none is available, you should challenge the outcome with HMRC.

Register your claim

If a claim is eligible you will be directed to register your claim by using your personal Government Gateway ID and password.

You will also need:

  • UK bank details (only provide bank account details where a Bacs payment can be accepted) including:
  • bank account number
  • sort code
  • name on the account
  • your address linked to your bank account

Finally, you will be asked to confirm that your business has been adversely affected by coronavirus.

Note: claims for the first quarter to 31 May 2020 will close 13 July 2020

SEISS extended for final three-month period

It was announced 29 May that the SEISS would be extended for a further three-month period to 31 August 2020. Applications for this period will be opened late August 2020. The amount that can be claimed for June-August 2020 will be limited to 70% of eligible earnings capped at a maximum grant of 6,570.

Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS)

On 12 May 2020, the Chancellor confirmed that this scheme will be extended until 31 October 2020. On the 29th May he confirmed the details of how the scheme would be changed to a flexible arrangement from 1 July 2020.

Until 1 September 2020, claims for time not worked will continue to be based on 80% of furloughed person’s salary up to the 2,500 maximum. For September this reduces to 70% capped at 2,187.50 and a further reduction in October to 60% capped at 1,875.

From 1 July 2020, employers can bring back furloughed staff part-time. Employers will be responsible for paying for this part-time work.

From 1 August 2020, employers will be required to pay for any employers' NIC and pension costs. From 1 September employers will be asked to contribute 10% of the CJRS wage costs for time not worked and from 1 October this contribution will increase to 20%.

The scheme will now close 31 October 2020.

Calculating holiday pay for workers without fixed hours

Government guidelines on this topic advise:

The amount of pay that a worker receives for the holiday they take depends on the number of hours they work and how they are paid for those hours. The principle is that pay received by a worker while they are on holiday should reflect what they would have earned if they had been at work and working.

A worker continues to accrue holiday entitlement while they are on sick leave, maternity leave, parental leave, adoption leave and other types of statutory leave. A worker may request holiday at the same time they are on sick leave.

The majority of the UK’s workforce are full-time workers on fixed hours and fixed pay. For these workers, typically on a fixed monthly salary, if they take a week’s holiday, they will receive the same pay at the end of the month as they normally receive.

The situation becomes more complicated when a worker does not work fixed or regular hours and so does not receive the same amount of pay each week, month or other pay period.

In these circumstances an employer should normally look back at a worker’s previous 52 paid weeks (known as the holiday pay reference period) to calculate what that worker should be paid for a week’s leave.

If a worker has not been in employment for long enough to build up 52 weeks’ worth of pay data, their employer should use the number of complete weeks of data they have. For example, if a worker has been with their employer for 26 complete weeks, that is what the employer should use.

If a worker takes leave before they have been in their job a complete week, then the employer has no data to use for the reference period. In this case the reference period is not used. Instead the employer should pay the worker an amount which fairly represents their pay for the length of time the worker is on leave. In working out what is fair, the employer should consider:

  • the worker’s pay for the job
  • the pay already received by the worker (if any)
  • what other workers doing a comparable role for the employer (or for other employers) are paid

Trade Credit Insurance update

Trade Credit Insurance provides cover to hundreds of thousands of business to business transactions, particularly in non-service sectors, such as manufacturing and construction. It covers suppliers selling goods against the company they are selling to, defaulting on payment and giving businesses the confidence to trade with one another.

Due to Coronavirus and businesses struggling to pay bills, they risk having credit insurance withdrawn, or premiums increasing to unaffordable levels.

To prevent this from happening, the government will temporarily guarantee business-to-business transactions currently supported by Trade Credit Insurance, ensuring the majority of insurance coverage will be maintained across the market. This will support supply chains and help businesses to trade with confidence as they can trust that they will be protected if a customer defaults on payment.

The guarantee will be delivered through a temporary reinsurance agreement with insurers currently operating in the market.

The government will work with businesses and the industry on the full details of the scheme to ensure firms are supported and risk is appropriately shared between the government and insurers.

Tax Diary June/July 2020

1 June 2020 - Due date for Corporation Tax due for the year ended 31 August 2019.

19 June 2020 - PAYE and NIC deductions due for month ended 5 June 2020. (If you pay your tax electronically the due date is 22 June 2020)

19 June 2020 - Filing deadline for the CIS300 monthly return for the month ended 5 June 2020.

19 June 2020 - CIS tax deducted for the month ended 5 June 2020 is payable by today.

1 July 2020 - Due date for Corporation Tax due for the year ended 30 September 2019.

6 July 2020 - Complete and submit forms P11D return of benefits and expenses and P11D(b) return of Class 1A NICs.

19 July 2020 - Pay Class 1A NICs (by the 22 July 2020 if paid electronically).

19 July 2020 - PAYE and NIC deductions due for month ended 5 July 2020. (If you pay your tax electronically the due date is 22 July 2020)

19 July 2020 - Filing deadline for the CIS300 monthly return for the month ended 5 July 2020.

19 July 2020 - CIS tax deducted for the month ended 5 July 2020 is payable by today.




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